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interior superior: lazy saturday edition

interior superiorTaylor P.Comment

i n t e r i o r  s u p e r i o r

 

We've been a bit quiet around these parts since the first of the year-- mainly due to the extraordinarily time-consuming process of relocating that seems to drag on quite literally forever. Thank you for sticking around with us, though, and we'll be posting new content daily again starting this month!

We have many new features on the way. Speaking of, are you an artist? If so, please contact us at ta@tamer-animals.com to be highlighted on a new feature we will have coming up soon! 

Here are some fresh looks that are inspiring our home renovation right now. Happy Saturday, folks! :)

( . ) Light, natural tones, and pops of color can really work wonders to enhance a space. 

(.) Light, natural tones, and pops of color can really work wonders to enhance a space. 

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(.) Graphic tile can add dimension to a kitchen or bathroom. 

( . ) Less is more! This minimal kitchen uses color to add wonderful visual contrast. 

(.) Less is more! This minimal kitchen uses color to add wonderful visual contrast. 

( . ) Wide open space can be useful for a variety of activities-- not just cooking! 

(.) Wide open space can be useful for a variety of activities-- not just cooking! 

( . ) Furniture pieces with low, clean lines can create directionality and visual harmony. 

(.) Furniture pieces with low, clean lines can create directionality and visual harmony. 

( . ) A clean and compact workspace can ease distractions while promoting productivity. 

(.) A clean and compact workspace can ease distractions while promoting productivity. 

( . ) Bringing the outdoors in can be calming and add some visual interest to your cleansing rituals. 

(.) Bringing the outdoors in can be calming and add some visual interest to your cleansing rituals. 

( . ) Cozy bedding and green plants can compliment a space well. Some plants can even help with replenishing oxygen in the home or with filtering out negative odors. 

(.) Cozy bedding and green plants can compliment a space well. Some plants can even help with replenishing oxygen in the home or with filtering out negative odors. 

( . ) Big mirrors can add dimension to a space and make it seem larger than life!

(.) Big mirrors can add dimension to a space and make it seem larger than life!

( . ) We just love the gray flooring with the pops of color. The adaptive reuse of the fireplace is a nice touch, too!

(.) We just love the gray flooring with the pops of color. The adaptive reuse of the fireplace is a nice touch, too!

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interior superior: 5 Things To Do Right Now to Go Metabolist Minimal

interior superiorTaylor P.Comment
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I've always, or at least since I can remember, had a huge fascination with Metabolism in Architecture. Perhaps it was my love for the 60's-70's or the World's Fair but much of what I love in design originated in the juxtaposition between the utilitarianism and the natural world. Metabolism is essentially that. Although the majority of features are inherently space age and minimal, the forms often took an exaggerated importance with a more organic feel. This, in some ways, was reminiscent of Brutalism but with a softer touch.

Rooted in postwar Japan, the movement began with a proposal by architects, artists, and designers to significantly overhaul the classical conventions of urban design. The sky was the limit in terms of how they represented this new form of the built environment. Think colossal structures with an organic, fuzzy side. 

Historically, the style was short-lived in terms of application but the longevity of different principles and characteristics lived on. The architecture was visionary and extremely ahead of the times with ideas that could be utilized now. For those more interested in the history and philosophy behind the movement, this book  is amazing. Although many of the buildings now are gone, or in a state of disrepair, the extreme detail of design and ergonomics were wonderful examples of what architecture could accomplish. 

I'm currently in the process of renovating a 1940's bungalow made out of marble and the interiors were severely dated in terms of having pre-minimalist bones but a lot of filler. The upper attic has a really unique layout and details which I felt would make the perfect studio to work from. I had some reservations about completely whitewashing the space but found that by taking a more organic approach it is coming together in a way that captures the spirit of this movement for me. While most modern designs don't really echo the same aesthetic, there are more distilled versions of some attributes of the style that could be utilized in our homes today. Some are more obvious than others but the organic spirit is what counts.

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I know most of us can't afford to completely overhaul our spaces or give up all of our precious worldly possessions in favor of something more utilitarian. We can, however, adapt some of the principles of this design strategy and make it our own.  I found some simple, relatively quick ways to echo this movement while still keeping it my own space and hope that these tips might help out others as well!

Nakagin Capsule Tower. ( s. )

Nakagin Capsule Tower. (s.)

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1. WHITE ALL OVER

Metabolism was an anomaly in the realm of architecture movements because it blended the grandiose and unconventional with the organic. There are some things about those bright white, pristine walls and low-intensity contrast that set my cold heart aflutter. Paired with textured woolen grays and pops of color (orange, chartreuse, and mint being some favorite recommendations,) the bright white becomes a warm and friendly environment sans the clutter. The result was more visually open, brighter, and energizing. Muted stone elements (like marble) add additional texture to a space. 

The white doesn't have to be just limited to walls either. I even went as far as painting some of my midcentury furniture white and it made a huge impact on how open the space feels. Circular forms and organic shapes were key features that set off the most symmetrical/perfected qualities in the space. Repetitive geometric forms were also desirable. Finding multiple functions or uses for items, when painted a similar color, can give a sense of cohesion that reduces the scattered energy in our modern world. Of course, using environmentally responsible paints or other low-impact paints would be ideal. 

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2. PLANT LOVE
The unity of man and nature with technology and advancement are characteristics very apparent in Metabolism. By taking a more passive role, we can find ways to configure the natural elements with the more stoic ones. When I think of that style-- mossy forms and a good balance of hanging/potted plants, cacti, or succulents are the first things that come to mind. Basically bringing the natural world in, with organic shapes and textures, can breathe new life into your space and put you in touch with your inner spirit. 

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3. HIGHLIGHT (A FEW OF ) YOUR FAVORITE THINGS
In an age of the maximalist, it is difficult to go minimalist. But it is good to *wabi sabi* your life a bit and put meaning into the objects that inhabit your space. If it does not serve a purpose or bring you joy, it needs to go. By having more minimal features in your space, it gives you an opportunity to highlight the things you love in a more intentional way. This speaks volumes about who you are as a person and can be a mechanism for growth (as well as reducing your carbon footprint)-- all good things. 

Wood is good, ya'll. ( s. )

Wood is good, ya'll. (s.)

4. WOOD IS YOUR COPILOT
Beyond contrasting with color, wood can be a great vehicle for offsetting the more clinical attributes of the Metabolist style Wood floors, some furnishings, or an accent wall can add an unexpected visual element to make your space more dynamic and aesthetically pleasing. Not only is it natural but it also has a story and a history as it was likely existing here before you were even a thought in the world.  It is a great way to pay homage to the world by showing some love for it. 

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5. A SEASHELL | A MOLD | A SPIRIT
Noburu Kawazoe wrote an essay entitled I want to be a sea-shell, I want to be a mold, I want to be a spirit and within it (albeit rather abstractly) discussed the proposed unity of man and nature. Something we can adopt from this is that, in existential terms, we come from our planet and the relationship to it is symbiotic. By honoring the natural world, we can live a more genuine life. Our environment is often the shape, or mold, that we are surrounded by. To transcend beyond ourselves and to unify with the world around us in a present way can enrich our lives and relationships in ways unfathomable. I believe, out of these 5, it is the most important takeway. By being intentional with our actions and our surroundings we can build a world that is closer to nature and our origins. 

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counterculture: why we create pt. I

countercultureSonam A.Comment
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We touched base with our founder and editor Taylor Parker earlier this week to discuss the act of creating design work and the pitfalls she has experienced in her profession. This is part of an ongoing series of experience-based articles dissecting the subject of why we create and what motivates us.  


SA: How did you get where you are today and what has impacted you the most?
TP: I always had an entrepreneurial spirit and wore a variety of hats over the years.  I spent the last six years getting my Bachelor's in Architecture and truly believed that was my calling. In retrospect I think it was always just a stepping stone to something more creative and less restrictive. Architecture, being a highly rigorous profession, was very good for me in terms of exercising design skills and strategies.  Design is such an intrinsic part of my person that I jokingly liken it to breathing. Getting creative blocks can equated with drowning for me so I try to constantly be in a state of creative output. 

I’ve always been a bit of a workaholic so the future I saw for myself was a very lonely one— working at firms in a bigger city and basically just existing. I always saw myself alone as serious relationships or children I believed to be beyond my scope. I worked full-time, went to school full-time, barely slept,  and really didn’t practice self-care on the level I should have at all. 

The turning points for me were pretty significant ones: I had a close-to-dying experience and a few years later found out I was pregnant with the most amazing little girl. I would say that those two things made me really look at the trajectory of my life and realize that what I thought was my destiny really was not at all what I had planned it to be.  I was always good at most anything I tried to do which made it more difficult to narrow down to a common niche. I had the ample ability to do anything I set my mind to but in the end lacked focus and execution. Ultimately this tenacity and fearlessness would always be my undoing although I strive more now to remedy those things. My work became a series of failures/experiences where I half-assed things simply because I thought I was a more seasoned sailor than I was in reality. I believe that in some regard I wanted to DO everything and BE everyone to such an exhaustive extent that I could not maintain it. To do such things would be impossible and idiotic. But nevertheless I found it quite unfortunate and had to come to terms with the fact that there is not enough time or energy to experience everything in this lifetime.  I wanted to spend every moment doing and being. It never occurred to me that just being myself was enough. I guess I thought I had something to prove and I know now that I don't have to prove anything to anyone. 

The realization of this was disappointing, but it takes courage to fail and pick yourself back up again and again. So I picked myself up again and again and again-- Over and over and over. I made a colossal amount of errors and l mistakes. And I made a lot of good decisions, too.  I am grateful that I had an amazing support system through family and friends who didn’t fault me for trying and encouraged me if at times that courage would falter. But at the end of the day I became stronger and I learned from most all of those experiences. I now look for the pitfalls and find alternate ways of dealing with them. Being self-aware is incredibly important and I highly recommend that people periodically examine their decisions and are honest about their motivations, especially when working in the creative field. 

In ways that were exponentially significant, and with limited timeframes, I found that not only did I really love teaching but the very basic creative activities that I grew up learning with my own mother. The way I felt about architecture once upon a time (a shimmering star that significantly burned out  in the end) paled in comparison to the synergy I now feel when I am just creating and instructing. So in a way, my “current field” became a meadow full of many things that brought me joy. The incredible thing about that type of joy is that it can spread like a wildfire if you let it. The good kind of wildfire that causes things to grow better-- not the bad-shitty-arsonist-kind, of course. 
 

SA: How do you research the business/marketing side of Tamer Animals?
TP:  One of the most fantastic inventions in my lifetime was the Internet. When I think about how I used to huddle over encyclopedias with their limited facts and figures in comparison to now with the world at our fingertips it is a very humbling thing. I have, in some form or another, been a lifelong student of business practices. 

I will be the first to tell you that I suck at marketing, especially when it comes to marketing myself as a "brand." I am not a fan of the limelight and prefer to sit on the sidelines whenever possible so it has been very character-building to have to exhibit a more sociable version of myself than I am generally comfortable with sharing. That is not to say that I am not an exhibitionist on some level (most creative types are) but I would rather delegate these things to people who enjoy them more than I do. I am constantly in a state of “most-improved-but-needs-improvement” and it has become a dedicated mission to figure out what motivates people to make the choices that they make. The internet, in some respects, has simplified much of this but ultimately complicated things as well.

To begin research  I usually sit down and list the questions I have. I am a huge fan of making lists, especially because I tend to be more on the “messy creative” side. Although a minimalist at heart, my mind is constantly going a mile a minute at times and clutter reigns supreme. I talk about as much as I type and about as fast. I try to curb my verbosity as I have a tendency to seek clarity to a fault. Part of being Type A is being too thorough, I suppose. 

So lists are my co-pilot and keep all that clutter at bay— until I accidentally lose the list in the clutter of course. Apps like to:day are a boon for me because they combine a really beautiful UI/UX with text and visuals. Being a visual person, I find this is very helpful. It is also helpful that I don't lose my phone quite as often as I would lose my lists.

I then systematically go through and search each one and write down any information I feel is exceptional. Sometimes this leads to more questions or notes but I think the process of asking those questions aloud is very helpful. Tax information, marketing, and basic business practices are all easily accessible and constantly in a state of flux. If you can learn something new every day, you are putting your time here to good use.

Product research is a bit trickier. I am constantly pinning and taking screenshots of things that inspire me but I do have an unspoken fear about unconsciously emulating others. I think gathering inspiration can be very helpful but there is a fine line between being inspired and being lazy. While the knee-jerk reaction is to  mimic via inspired means the better questions to ask are more meaningful: How can I improve upon this? If I couldn’t get anyone to buy this, would I enjoy it for my own use? Am I being truthful to my mission and my evolution? Am I being genuine with clients/customers by releasing this product? 

SA: What is your greatest motivator?
TP: That is really a hard thing to pin down. I have always tended to be a very complex person with heavily structured ideals about the act of creation. In a physical sense, my daughter is probably my biggest motivator. I want her to have rich experiences in her life and to be able to expose her to a wide variety of objects and subjects. I am eternally grateful for my mom for she instilled a deep respect for creation within me and taught me not only to have strength but also integrity. These are things that alone are powerful but all together create a high level of perseverance and a hotbed for creativity.

My mother is incredibly skilled in all things creative and I like to think that the majority of my successes were a result of her letting me make messes, think independently, and create without limits. Seeing the recognition and curiosity my daughter exhibits not only motivate me but also make me appreciate the sacrifices my mother made to help me become the person I am today. I strive to be better every day and release kindness into the world any way I can. 

From a personal sense, I think my biggest motivation is seeking balance. It has been a running theme throughout my life— the pursuit of tranquility— and I think it is such an important part of who I am. I strive to make a mark on the world each day in a limited capacity, even if it is just in my tiny universe. I spent a large early portion of my life seeking stability through relationships and thinking that those would make me whole and happy. I thought that once I found my "soulmate" it would "free up" the time i was invested in such things. I believed that by doing so I would have the the newfound freedom and energy to devote more to my creative pursuits. I thought love was the answer to everything and was very naive about the world and human behavior.  I think I lacked the self-confidence and self-awareness to realize that they were obstacles and not bridges. I spent an embarrassing amount of time sinking into those murky waters only to find that the happiest place I could be in was when I was producing.

SA: What have been some of your biggest hurdles as a business or individual?
TP: *Consistency is always a hurdle for me because life tended to have ideas of its own. I always had good intentions but follow-through can be ineffectual. It is still something I am mindful of even now.
*I was always very “hands-on” with any work I did. Having to step back due to time constraints and become more passive in my approach has been very challenging.
*Financials are always a hurdle. I think it helps to treat it as a second job and not a hobby, but keeping a good cash flow going from a reliable source is very importance. It seems counterintuitive in some ways. As much as many of us hope we will be at the right place at the right time, the reality is that it takes a ton of hard work, dedication, and hustling to get where you want to go.
*Scheduling under very strict time constraints (such as having kids or an intense job) is extremely difficult. While I find it inspiring that some women are able to juggle four kids and a high-profile job while running their small business, most of us are under severe constraints. Dedicating even an hour a day is helpful. Write everything down as you think of it. Don’t look at other people to assess your value. 

SA: What advice would you give to makers who are just starting out?
TP: *Don’t get caught up in what is trending. Pave your own way. Choose your own adventure.
*If you fail, don’t just fold or wallow in a big ole pile of self-pity. Ask yourself these three questions: 1) What did I do wrong? 2) What lesson should I have learned from this? and 3) How can I do better next time? Take responsibility for where you have fallen short and looking at failures as gifts and lessons. Not only can you place a positive spin on things by doing this but looking at them as experiences (whether good or bad) ultimately gives you the gumption to move forward.
*Don’t obsess over perfect. Perfect is for the infallible people that are in denial. Be human and create things that expose your humanity and breadth of experience. Don’t be afraid to deviate from all that you know and love. Perfect can also be dull. Dare to go against the grain.
*You will have $0 days and you will have $500 days. Make sure whatever you are doing is for the right reasons or you will never be satisfied with your output regardless of how much you make. 
*Work-life balance SUCKS sometimes. If you overextend yourself too much and don’t take the time out to charge your batteries, you’ll burn out. Not only does this decrease your productivity severely but your lousy lease on life can affect the folks around you (which is a crummy thing to do.) Don’t be an asshole. Get some actual sleep, step away from the phone/computer/whatever, and eat an actual meal. 
*Evolution is important. We are constantly revolving and evolving. Don’t get stuck in old, bad habits and always keep in mind that your origin is not your destination. You and you alone are responsible for the direction your life can take.  Don’t be afraid to experiment and don't be afraid to fail either. Become a newer, better version of yourself every chance you get and this will be reflected in your work as well.

SA: How do you develop your work?
TP: I try to clear my mind. I was never really adept at this or good at meditation so I start by making forms or words on a blank page and see what develops. I think my personal design style is very intuitive— a series of unconscious movements to arrive at a nondescript location. Everything is in a state of being chaotic and unplanned and as a more rigorous person I enjoy the freedom of the disarray. I like to think that I am a scientist more than an artist. I want to throw all of the elements in and see what comes out in the end. They are all experiments to me. Creating is exhilarating and sometimes even a bit scary. But when your excitement overrides your fears you will know you are in a good place. There are unintentional moments in design that can make or break what you are doing but you should never be scared of that. It’s far easier to close your eyes and leap in to the unknown. You can say a few prayers beforehand but the outcome is largely dependent on your frame of mind in the moment.

SA: What is your typical process day-to-day?
TP:  I try to harness creative energy through experience. Rituals are very important to me. The more stress I am under or deadlines that are imposed the more I begin to wane in productivity so I try to limit stressors and prioritize better. I used to set an unrealistic amount of tasks on my lists and became dissatisfied and disappointed with myself so I am not much more realistic about my constraints and energy levels. Rituals like morning coffee or tea, nature walks, crafting with my daughter, singing, and reading are all things that feed my soul. Once I feel energized, I will devote a couple of evenings in a row to distinct tasks after my daughter goes to bed. I am a night owl so working at night is my modus operandi. Being a single parent means that my free time is effectively a hot commodity so I try to make every moment count now.

I spend my days focused on what matters so at night I will be able to celebrate that freedom by calling on a stream of consciousness. I will sometimes knock out four or five illustrations in an evening if I am on a roll. Whether they are perfect or not is immaterial. It is the act of creating that I respond to— the journey rather than the destination. As an INFJ I enjoy my solitude unimpeded in those times and I think those are the moments especially when my work is able to take on a life all its own.

SA: Where do you hope to see yourself in five years?
TP:  We are in the process of moving to a sleepy mountain town near Asheville, so I hope I have become established a prosperous career in that time and can continue creating and experimenting. The idea of being nestled in the mountains surrounded by nature is an irony not lost on me who always prided herself as a city girl. There is something magical though about starting a new life and being a new person. Five years down the road I hope the continue be a good mother, a good daughter, a good friend. I hope to be an even better version of myself whether my ventures are successful or not. I would like to bring more to the table than just myself and to be able to be of service to the world in some capacity.

 

 

Taylor Parker is an architectural/textile designer, illustrator, blogger, children's book author, and maker from Knoxville, Tenn. Through whimsical designs and vibrant colors she hopes to capture the beauty of abstraction through a marriage of nature and the built environment. She likes to combine hand-painted objects with some digital manipulation as her signature style. She has also been in the vintage business for over fifteen years and loves finding unique pieces for wear or environment.  She has a daughter and furkid, loves soul and shoegaze (she is also an occasional DJ,)  and enjoys getting her feet wet in new projects and mediums. 

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interior superior: the city in color

interior superiorSonam A.Comment

This week we are very enthusiastic about adding those little pops of color and texture into our spaces. Whether "home" is in the city or in the suburbs, our wellbeing is often influenced by the spaces we inhabit (see this article and this one for more info.) Many in the design industry know this quite well, but what about the rest of us? Here is a weekly roundup of some unique ways you can add a more dynamic aesthetic to your living space. Elevate your mood = elevate your life, right? 

Also, if you're a creative native, don't feel bad if you're not a "minimalist." A lot can be said for a messy desk (or house.) For example, you might be a creative genius. Or maybe you are just a sloth like me-- I won't judge! 

P.S.--We are HUGE fans of this fantastic app. You should be, too!

Warm matte finished wood and pops of complimentary colors can add so many happy vibes to an otherwise plain kitchen ( source )

Warm matte finished wood and pops of complimentary colors can add so many happy vibes to an otherwise plain kitchen (source)

Patterned tile in your kitchen or bathroom is great, but taking a color out of it and reproducing it in your textiles or dinnerware is even better! How pretty is this? ( source )

Patterned tile in your kitchen or bathroom is great, but taking a color out of it and reproducing it in your textiles or dinnerware is even better! How pretty is this? (source)

Sometimes your "pop" of color can be warm tones against cooler ones. The result is clean, modern, and inviting. ( source )

Sometimes your "pop" of color can be warm tones against cooler ones. The result is clean, modern, and inviting. (source)

Live plants, warm earthy shades (green, blue, and brown) can liven up a space while still looking effortless. ( source )

Live plants, warm earthy shades (green, blue, and brown) can liven up a space while still looking effortless. (source)

Adding an accent pop of color in a room and tying it in throughout the house with your belongings can aid in pulling a theme together without being overbearing. ( source )

Adding an accent pop of color in a room and tying it in throughout the house with your belongings can aid in pulling a theme together without being overbearing. (source)

Vintage vibes abound, using complimentary vintage pieces and poppy bright colors (such as on the door) can be party in the front and business in the back. We love how these vintage pieces mesh so well with the new ones! That rug really pulls everything together also by adding playful texture. ( source )

Vintage vibes abound, using complimentary vintage pieces and poppy bright colors (such as on the door) can be party in the front and business in the back. We love how these vintage pieces mesh so well with the new ones! That rug really pulls everything together also by adding playful texture. (source)

Happy murals, bright (but not too bright) colors, and whimsical rugs can create a safe and imaginative space for the kiddos. ( source )

Happy murals, bright (but not too bright) colors, and whimsical rugs can create a safe and imaginative space for the kiddos. (source)

Although we wouldn't recommend doing this to EVERY wall or EVERY room, extremely bright pigments can be eye-catching and spur the creative native in you to action (as can coffee.) ( source )

Although we wouldn't recommend doing this to EVERY wall or EVERY room, extremely bright pigments can be eye-catching and spur the creative native in you to action (as can coffee.) (source)

Unique geometries and bright contrasting colors really make this space feel comfortable and friendly. ( source )

Unique geometries and bright contrasting colors really make this space feel comfortable and friendly. (source)

The pops of color here and wood texture are phenomenal and make the room seem cozy despite its size. ( source )

The pops of color here and wood texture are phenomenal and make the room seem cozy despite its size. (source)

Prints with similar styles and colors can work beautifully together while creating interest.  ( source )

Prints with similar styles and colors can work beautifully together while creating interest.  (source)

Bright colors work well against wood furnishings and white walls while not appearing overly cluttered or ambiguous. ( source)

Bright colors work well against wood furnishings and white walls while not appearing overly cluttered or ambiguous. (source)

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▼▽ i n t e r i o r s u p e r i o r △▲: clever spaces

Taylor A.Comment

▼▽ i n t e r i o r  s u p e r i o r △▲//clever spaces

Filter harsh sunlight with some hanging plants. (via

radar magazine

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Like compact living? Stacking is a great design strategy for tight spaces. (via

house and leisure

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Wood and tile add an interesting dynamic to a minimal bathroom. (via

husligheter

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Lovely colors and prints brighten up this living room. (via

sfgirlbybay

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Found wooden materials can add texture to an otherwise plain wall. (via

a beautiful mess

A wooden ceiling can liven up a lighter-toned room. (via

jas tang

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Wooden panels can prove a unique choice in a white kitchen. (via

my scandinavian home

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Large-format prints can be an inexpensive and interesting conversation piece. (via

lay baby lay

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Chalkboard paint is perfect for drawings and last-minute to-do lists. (via

squarestate

)

♡♡♡♡

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design therapy: FREE iPhone 5 Templates!

Taylor A.Comment

  d e s i g n   t h e r a p y

Every once in a while, we like to give you guys a little freebie (because you deserve it, amiright?). Remember that "Asia 1960" set we did a while back? We decided to put them to good use and make fun clear-case inserts for your iPhone!  We'll also be making additional sets in the next few weeks for 4 and 5s users-- because we adore you precious angels, too. To get the template, just click on the image above (it should open in a new window full-size) and right click or drag to save the file to your computer. We had luck printing them at Kinko's (on a glossy, thick paper) but they're equally awesome on our Canon printer, so no worries there! Then just follow the instructions on the bottom. We purchased a clear case from Hobby Lobby (

here

), but there are tons on

Amazon

also if you don't have a HL in your area. Thanks to everyone who has been supporting this blog thus far! If you end up using these, please send us a link  or tag us on instagram (@tamer.animals) so we can see your beautiful handiwork! Comment below and let us know what you'd like to see for the next group! Any brave ideas?

xoxo,

the staff

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baby love: faces + spaces

Maddie C.Comment

Hi, all! Today we're pairing up some lovely fashion with some gorgeous rooms, for your reading pleasure. Whether paired for dress or play, kids need a comfortable and creative environment to thrive. What are some must-haves for your kids' rooms? 

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the boo and the boy

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🐼♥️,

Maddie

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▼▽ i n t e r i o r s u p e r i o r △▲

Taylor A.Comment

i n t e r i o r   s u p e r i o r

Whether you're adding some pops of color to a dull room or completely revamping your home, here are some great ways to spruce up your interiors. 

A swing in a large living room space adds nostalgia (and great exercise while Netflix-perusing!) (via

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Non-traditional uses of pallets add texture and form to an accent wall. (via

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Adding geometric shapes and a variety of colors can bring life to a minimal space. (via

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 Hanging plants aid in purifying the environment and hint of nature to your home. (via

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Minimalist drawers and maximum horizontal spaces enlarge space psychologically and provide a connection between spaces. (via

interior junkie

)

An unexpected color and beautiful tiles can spruce up  a lavatory and still exude cleanliness. (via

my scandinavian home

)

Unfinished wood adds texture and spatial form to a space. (via domaine)

Pairing a cool color with a warm-toned floor can give even harmony to a room. (via

decor8

)

Utilizing all aspects of the color wheel can liven up white walls and provide variety. (via

dustjacket

)

Angular ceilings create dramatic, definitive spaces. (via 

the design files

)

♡♡♡♡

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▼▽ i n t e r i o r s u p e r i o r △▲

Taylor A.Comment

▼▽ i n t e r i o r  s u p e r i o r △▲

Potted plants and stamped trees bring nature inside. (via

2014ida

)

Nature prints and geometric fabrics have a charming contrast. (via

homestyle

)

Fur textures and minimal tones create variety in a room. (via

design hunter ltd

.)

Natural tones, plants, and natural light can make a space feel inviting. (via

SSP

)

Leaving walls natural gives a comfortable nostalgia to a space. (

source

)

Wood textures and a small palette can add layers to a space. (via

decor8

)

Wooden furnishings and white walls can make folk prints pop. (via

vtwonen

)

Succulents and wood furnishings liven up a space. (via

apartment therapy

)

Floral and vintage prints and paintings add hints of nature to a kitchen or sunroom. (via

poppytalk

)

Dark walls and cascading vines cause an unexpected vibrancy to a small space. (via

martina thornhill

)

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▼▽ i n t e r i o r s u p e r i o r △▲

Taylor A.Comment

▼▽ i n t e r i o r  s u p e r i o r △▲

By using inventive and simple means, you can add unique geometries to an otherwise normal floor. (via d

esign gallerist

)

Raw wood furnishings and floors create continuity of space. (via

sfgirlbybay

)

All-wood floors and furnishings allow all other textures to be appear more vibrant. (via

dezeen

Concrete floors and plain wooden walls have a brute elegance. (via

yellowtrace

)

 Clean lines and a mostly neutral color scheme create a relaxing living area. (via

bolig magasinet

)

Using different shades of a neutral tones causes a space to seem clean and inviting. (via

FANCY

)

A singular color can make a pronounced impression upon entering a space. (via

interior design

)

Sophisticated simplicity is quite evident in this minimal kitchen.  (via

urdesign

)

 A simple palette and soft textures make for an alluring and inviting kitchen. (via

a well traveled woman

)

A simple bright white wall can be visually elegant. (via

unfinished home

)

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--▲▽home sweet home△▼--

Taylor A.Comment

h o m e  s w e e t  h o m e

Each week, Maddie and I will be scouring the internet and showing you some incredibly fun design ideas for your home! Wallpaper, color (or the lack thereof), and patterns are just some ways to spice things up! We'll also be highlighting products we love and tutorials for projects you can do yourself!

Welcome ▲▽

HOME

△▼! 

❤︎,

Maddie+Taylor

 Who doesn't love a bright shiny anchor on a pretty painted door?(

source

)

Go where the buffalo roam with floral patterns and unique pictures. (

source

)

Wood tones and wallpaper are a match made in Heaven. (

source

)

Tribal patterns and southwestern flair complement these solid neutrals. (

source

)

Crisp contrast with black and white make a clean and cool Nordic-style space. (

source

)

Wood and neutral solids with mod patterns can spruce up a dark floor. (

source

)

Honeycomb tiling halfway up can add variety and style to a minimal kitchen. (

source

)

Offset pastel wall colors with darker furnishings for a comfortable contrast.  (

source

)

Use kitchenware that is both functional but compliments the style of the room. (

source

)

Pops of color add warmth to neutral spaces. (

source

)

Placing desks near wide windows makes for a comfortable workspace. (

source

)

Live plants not only add character to your home, but also help to keep the air pure! (

source

)

Native and tribal designs add variety to singular spaces. (

source

)

Spruce up wooden cabinets by adding modern flair. 

(source

)

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➾b a b y l o v e➾: best nests

Maddie C.Comment

When people say we're "nesting," we're not just decorating for a new baby (or big kid, for that matter.) We're building something. We're building their imaginations, their creativity, and their love for color and texture. As our kids grow up, they will grow with the spaces they inhabit, so to give them inspiring places to play and rest will better prepare them for a bright future. Here are some amazing nests from all over the world:

(

source

)

🐼♥️,

Maddie

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Pinterest Roundup: stripes

Maddie C.Comment

I don't know about the rest of you, but I can never own enough things with stripes. Dresses, blouses, skirts, pillows, shoes, notebooks, pencils, etc....get my drift? Fashion was greatly transformed by stripes, and it is my personal belief that we have Coco Chanel to thank for it. 

But stripes are wonderful, and clean-looking, and they can be used in so many different ways. They make us happy by reminding us that everything is linear on some level or another, and there's of course the nostalgia of maritime style.  

So, hey! Let's take a gander at the wonderful world of stripes. 

How could we not love Jean Seberg in stripes? (

source

)

Even in nature, stripes have always been your friend. (

source

)

Daphne van den Heuvel knows what's up. (

source

)

You can wear them with solids for instant magical superpowers. (

source

)

Because sometimes stripes are just darling... (

source

)

And sometimes they're daring... (

source

)

And sometimes you can wear stripes on stripes and it doesn't look like you're on drugs.. (

source

)

And when all else fails, you can eat your ice cream with stripes.

(source

)

🐼♥️,

Maddie

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coffee + craft: make a coconut rhubarb latte and build your own coffee bar!

Taylor A.Comment

Hey guys! Welcome to our first

Coffee + Craft

workshop. First we're going to make a coconut rhubarb latte (don't be thrown off by the rhubarb-- it's amazing!) courtesy of Denver's barista skills. Then I'm going to walk you through the quick, easy, and cheap way to build a coffee bar in your home!

COFFEE:COCONUT RHUBARB LATTE

Rhubarb and coconut might just be a match made in heaven.

what you need:

1/2  can of coconut milk

1/2 cup of soy milk or whole milk (He says local dairy with milk fat would be preferable)

3 tsp. of rhubarb simple syrup (Denver swears by

this recipe

from Tori Avey but if you can find some locally, good!)

1/2 tsp of coconut oil

2 shots of espresso (or you can use 1/4 cup of a cold brew concentrate if you're in a jam)

1 tablespoon of wildflower honey 

A spritz of cayenne pepper

several drops of beet juice (optional, for richer color)

Small whisk or manual milk frother (if you have one on your espresso machine, even better!)

1-2 tsp of coconut flakes (as a garnish, optional)

for an ICED latte:

S1: After you have all of the ingredients gathered up, make two shots of espresso (if not using espresso, heat up the brew just barely-- this helps dissolve the syrup and honey.) 

S2: Combine espresso and simply syrup/honey. The rhubarb will usually give everything a red tint, but the simple syrup is tasty!)

S3: Add milk and coconut milk. 

S4: Stir mixture together until well blended.

S5: Pour over a cup of ice. ideally, the ice should only take up 1/3 of the cup size. If you want it to be a more dynamic red-pink rather than a muddy red-pink, add a few drops of beet juice to reach the color you desire.

S6: Garnish with coconut flakes and a light dose of cayenne pepper (optional)

for a HOT latte:

S1: After you have all of the ingredients gathered up, make two shots of espresso (if not using espresso, heat up the brew just barely-- this helps dissolve the syrup and honey.) 

S2: Meanwhile, combine both milks and heat them on a stove (or your espresso machine) on low-medium heat until it starts to ALMOST boil. 

S3: Combine espresso and simply syrup/honey. The rhubarb will usually give everything a red tint, but the simple syrup is tasty!) 

S4: Stir 90% of the milks into the espresso/syrup mixture in your mug/cup. The additional 10% can either be manually frothed with a whisk or you can add a little cold milk and use a machine frothed. 

S5: Pour frothed milk on top as a cap. Let it sit for a minute or two to cool down a bit. 

If you want it to be a more dynamic red-pink rather than a muddy red-pink, add a few drops of beet juice to reach the color you desire. 

S6: Garnish with coconut flakes and a light dose of cayenne pepper (optional)

Prep. Time:

After making simple syrup (~40 min), prep is typical less than 5 minutes. 

+

CRAFT: AWESOME COFFEE BAR 

So.....

The backstory on this is that when I was nineteen I started my first business, which was among other things, a coffee shop. That was after working as a barista at a local coffee shop for almost two years, so I really liked making coffee. I really didn't have a good prep area to make speciality drinks in our house (my coffeemaker divorced my kitchen counter long ago), so I was spending ridiculous amounts of money on drinks at local coffeehouses and Starbucks when I could have been making them at home. Then, I had the epiphany that I really needed a desk of some sort since I endure so many grueling hours rendering architecture projects on my laptop, so in the end it seemed like a pretty good idea to combine the two workspaces. Much to my boyfriend's chagrin, I drilled about 15 holes in the wall, but it's incredible to have a sturdy space to work.

The best part was that it was cheap. And it's awesome.

How cheap it is really depends on the materials you can and can't live without. I splurged on the heavy-duty mounting brackets, but cut corners on picking a more eco-friendly, yet inexpensive wood. You may want to use a more expensive wood or a different size than we did, but definitely shop around and compare prices. The actually coffee bar itself (the wood plank and the brackets/screws) only ran us roughly $15 for the wood, $18 for the heavy-duty brackets, and $4 for a box of screws. You can, however, keep building on to it and create a workstation, which is what we did. 

Gathering supplies and pre-planning. 

materials needed (what we used)

1  12"x  ~1" x 8' piece of glued plank wood (Lowe's has this and a plank-style version for around $10-20)

1 box of coarse drywall screws

2-3 heavy duty brackets (I would highly recommend 3 if you're going over 6' in length)

1 powerful drill/screwdriver

1 stud finder or good ears

3 1/4" screws (to secure the board to the brackets)

1 bottle of Howard's Cutting Block Food-safe Prep Oil/Wax (or equivalent protectant for wood)

1 roll of paper towels or sponge 

1 Tape Measure

1 Pen/Pencil to mark drill holes

1 Level

Safety Glasses

optional materials

1 12" x ~1" x 6' piece of glued plank wood

1 LED strip (ours was $40 and plugs into the wall, but there are many types in several price ranges)

1 Unfinished wood shelf (with an overhang to help block light, should you use an LED lamp- we found one at target for $8 and Ikea has a wide assortment, also)

1 unfinished wooden square box (we bought one at a hobby/craft store)

E 6000 adhesive (for metals and adhering wooden box to small plank)

Cute decor to spruce it up

The final result. 

S1:

Beginning with your measuring tape,

measure the area you are wanting to place the coffee bar at

. Ideally, there should be enough space between the wall and the bar for cords. If you would like it to be flush against the wall, make sure to cut notches/holes in the board before you attach it to the wall. 

S2:

Purchase your board. Cut your board to the desired length

(Places like Lowe's typically provide a single cut in-house, so you don't even have to trim anything if you don't want to.) We went ahead and applied 3-4 coats of the mineral oil (20 min. drying time per coat) with some paper towels and let it dry overnight. If you use varnish or polyurethane, make sure to do it in a well ventilated area and allow adequate drying time so it won't be too sticky. 

S3:

Once you have your board,

use the measuring tape to measure the appropriate height.

(if using chairs or stools at the bar, make sure a person can fit comfortably underneath it). 

S4:

Find your wall studs. The higher the pitch, the closer to the stud you are. If you don't trust your ears, a stuff finder is a handy thing to have. Once you've found your studs, place a pencil line at the appropriate height/stud location. 

S5:

Now you'll want to mount the first bracket. In a perfect world, you would be able to fit three brackets equidistantly so that the load is distributed properly, but it is really dependent on the length of your board and location of the studs (they should be spaced at the same intervals unless it is an older house.) Use your best judgment. If you can only use two brackets, try to get them as evenly spaced as possible to prevent the wood from bowing. The brackets can hold up to 500 lbs each-- the wood is not so fortunate, although it can withstand quite a bit, too. Place a tick mark on the wall where each screw hole is. These will be your guide to prime the wall space.

S6:

 Take your drill and, using a drywall screw as a guide (or a small drill bit),

create holes where the tick marks were that you just made. 

S7:

Now

proceed to mount the bracket to the wall

. I would recommend screwing the top hole in first, then the bottom, and then the middle (if applicable.) Follow S5-S7 for the second bracket, third, etc. 

S8:  Once you place your board,

use a level to verify that everything is straight

. If it isn't, you'll have to go through the process of remounting it again, which will leave more holes to fill! 

S9:

 Once the wood is securely in place,

take the 1/4" screws and screw them in to the top hole in the bracket to help secure the board

S10:

And voila!

You're done!

Go make some coffee!

S11:  

If you want to go the optional route

       S11A: Prime all of the wood. 

       S11B: After that dries, affix the square wooden box to it with a healthy amount of E6000 glue.

       S11C: While that is drying, take the wooden shelf and glue the LED fixture to it with E6000. Make sure to not glue any parts that you may need to remove. We ended up using a scrap piece of wood to make a longer light shield, so if you need one, glue that on, too. Let this sit overnight.

       S11D: Then, take more drywall screws, find the studs, and screw directly into the studs until it is snug against the wall. 

       S11E: Decorate! 

The optional workspace component. 

We hope you enjoyed the first edition of

coffee + craft

. If you have any questions or are stumped on something in the instructions, feel free to leave a comment and we'll walk you through it! Thanks, guys! Happy brewing!

-Denver + Taylor

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